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Monthly Archives: June 2013

I love June! We’ve already had one rhubarb harvest from our back yard patch, which we made into a rhubarb and apple crumble. I may post that recipe on the food blog at some point, but I forgot to take a photo.

Yesterday we drove up to Markham with friends and picked strawberries at Organics Family Farm.  It was the perfect sunny morning for it, and we got about 8 litres (2 large baskets) of strawberries (my 8 year old picked one large basket himself!). They were delicious.

Afterwards we went to a friend’s place  nearby and had a picnic on their front lawn and said hello to the lambs, chickens, and the rabbit. We were alerted to the fact that there was a wild strawberry patch in the corner of the lawn, and even with the huge cultivated strawberries in the car we couldn’t resist the call of the wild ones. They are teeny tiny but they are so much more complex and flavourful. Wow.

When we got home later I made a batch of preserves  (1 kg of strawberries/5 cups), flash froze another kilo, and couldn’t resist dipping a few in chocolate as well. This morning it was a delicious strawberry nut shake for me and later pancakes and strawberry sauce for brunch. I have one more batch (1 kg) of preserves to make, but it was a busy day so I didn’t get to it today.

chocolate covered strawberriesIn my inbox when I got home yesterday was an email from Not Far From The Tree (NFFTT) about a mulberry pick this afternoon. (Note: for more on NFFTT, read the other posts I’ve written on them.) And I managed to get in on the pick! Of course I replied before I looked into the weather, which I was later informed by the coordinator was calling for rain, but I figured I’d get out there and go for it anyone, dragging along one of my children.

This afternoon came and sure enough, the sky was dark as the time drew near. I would usually ride or take transit, but I bailed and drove (did I tell you we replaced the gas guzzler with a super efficient and much smaller car?) with my eldest to the pick. We were there 10 minutes early and just as I was pulling into the parking space it started absolutely pouring. But it let up a bit in the 10 minutes. It was still raining but everyone showed up (that’s rare) and we decided to go for it despite the rain.

first NFFTT pick of the year: mulberriesSo it turns out that mulberry picking is done easiest by spreading a tarp out and shaking the tree. How fun is that?! We picked nearly 13 pounds of mulberries and barely made a dent as there are a ton of berries on there that are not yet ripe. They also have a cherry tree so they figure NFFTT will be back in a week or so to do the cherries and the rest of the mulberries.

I’ve never eaten mulberries. They are interesting, and look and even taste a bit like a blackberry. Or maybe blackcurrant. Because every time I ate one I thought of cassis.

They are delicate and don’t last long, so I made them into a crumble this evening (vaguely based on this recipe), but not in time to eat tonight (besides, we had the delicious chocolate covered strawberries to eat!). It will be delicious for tomorrow, I’m sure.

Have I mentioned this year how much I love NFFTT? What a great little community organization. The supreme gleaner (leading the pick) was a mulberry enthusiast, and there was at least one newbie there who I’m sure will be back on more picks (even the rainy ones), as well as another mom and child, and the home owners came out and joined us with their children. They actually use the fruit, but it is too much for them so they also get help from NFFTT, which is also giving to the community because 1/3 (actually 1/2, because the homeowners didn’t take their 1/3 today) of the pickings go to a community organization like food banks, shelters, and community kitchens. And we get to learn about fruit that grows abundantly in this climate, and have new experiences picking at eating new things. Brilliant. Oh, and I learned later that today was the first pick of the season. How fun!

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This Saturday is LEAF’s Leslieville Tree Festival, which is always good fun.

Leslieville Tree Festival

Leslieville Tree Festival (click for source link)

So I was checking out LEAF’s (Local Enhancement and Appreciation of Forests) website and saw that they sell garden kits, including a couple of Edible Garden Kits, which I would totally buy for myself and to support them, except our little postage stamp just doesn’t get enough sun. They also have a Native Garden Kits, which I may get for our backyard, as there is a shade option (there’s shade, butterfly, beautiful border, and songbird options). How cool is that?

Speaking of gardening, I was out last weekend and cleaned up my new front yard herb garden and put a border on it, in an attempt to get my boys to stop trampling it. I also labelled them. Mostly so I can send the boys out for various herbs when I’m cooking. I’m totally excited about it. Eventually I hope to remove the shrubs in front of the porch and replace them with raspberry bushes. Big job, but I’ll get there…

I’d post a photo, but I have yet to take a half decent shot.

I wanted to pass on an article I read in the New York Times on Breeding the Nutrition out of our Food. It’s a little discouraging, but it’s something we should all know… So give it a read.

For a little teaser, have a look at their infographic below (click on it for the source URL of the graphic, the article is here).

On an up note, our CSA (community supported agriculture) Plan B Organic Farms grows some of the old breeds, like purple carrots and purple potatoes, and often include arugula and other dark green leafies, which is encouraging.

Image from NYTimes “Nutritional Weaklings in the Supermarket” May 25, 2013